Posts Tagged ‘Amoy Street’

Kiyoshi Izakaya Japanese Restaurant – Affordable Bento sets available for delivery

[Media Collaboration]

Now that Phase 2 is here and dining-in is acceptable once again, although limited to a maximum of 5 in a group, many of us still plan on eating at home to minimise time spent outside. Recently I had the pleasure of receiving a delivery from Kiyoshi Japanese Restaurant. Of all my food deliveries so far, Kiyoshi’s meal was the most convenient because we had ordered bento boxes so the meal already came nicely laid out in bento box form. So here’s a tip if you want a fuss free delivery meal, order bento boxes, be it Japanese or Chinese. Otherwise, be prepared to unwrap lots of plastic containers or packets!

Launched in May 2020, Kiyoshi prides itself on fresh ingredients prepared using an innovative, contemporary approach. The restaurant specialises in inaniwa udon, Other highlights of Kiyoshi include sashimi, donburi, ramen, yakitori and affordably priced bento sets. We ordered 2 bento sets and 2 sides to try. Their bentos start from $9.90 a set.

Kiyoshi Izakaya Japanese Restaurant (2)

Pictured here are Pork Katsu Bento – $16.80+ | Unagi Bento – $18.80+ | Chicken Karaage – $9.80+ | Ebi Tempura- $14.80+

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Le Binchotan : Bincho-tan smoked food, even desserts!

After reading good reviews about Le Binchotan, I was excited to be able to get the opportunity to check out Le Binchotan a couple of weeks back. Le Binchotan is a French-Japanese tapas bar and restaurant, helmed by Chef Atsuhiko Hagiwara from Ginza Tokyo restaurant en.terrible, together with Singapore Head Chef Jeremmy Chiam. At first glance, the dishes appear to be predominantly French/Western, but you soon realise where the Japanese bit is : Japanese ingredients like uni, daikon and miso being infused into the dishes.

Le Binchotan (2)

The selling point about Le Binchotan is that their meats and seafood are smoked over bincho-tan (aka white charcoal made from oak). Done well, this imparts to the food a nice smoky flavour, elevating the food to a different dimension. Bincho-tan is the preferred choice of Japanese chefs as the charcoal burns at a lower temperature for a longer period of time compared to ordinary charcoal.  I read that some people find the smoky flavour at Le Binchotan to be on the heavy side, however I on the other hand thought it was hardly noticeable. What impressed me though were the innovative dishes, surprising us with ingredient parings that you don’t normally see together, or presenting the ingredients in a new way.

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